• www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at

Knee

The knee is the largest joint in the human body and markedly complex in terms of its structure. The femur and the tibia move against each other in the knee joint. The joint cartilage enables sliding of the joint surfaces of the femur and the lower leg. Cartilage injuries can either occur in the context of acute injuries or even chronically as a result of malpositions.

The central and most important anterior and posterior stabilisation of the knee joint is carried out using the cruciate ligaments. Lateral stabilisation is carried out using the medial and lateral collateral ligament. The shock absorber function in the knee joint is adopted by the medial and lateral menisci. These are crescent moon-shaped discs that serve as secondary stabilisers.

The anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament, and the medial and lateral menisci, which stabilise the knee joint together in the directions of the space, are particularly frequently affected by injuries. Simultaneous injury of the anterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and the medial meniscus is known as the "unhappy triad".

 

Please note that medical indications and treatments change constantly. Sometimes these changes occur more rapidly than I am able to update on my homepage. Some information regarding dosage, prescription and compositions of medications may have changed in the meantime. Reading an internet page cannot replace visiting a doctor - it may be that during an examination and subsequent discussion with your doctor, other information is also communicated as a result of new scientific knowledge.