• www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at

Impingement

If you look at the osseous channel through which the rotator cuff runs, you can easily see that on exertion, damage to the muscle tissue occurs. Like a rope frays when mountain climbing if it is constantly pulled over a sharp edge, the musculature can also suffer small injuries during movements. This is mainly the case if the space available simultaneously becomes narrower as a result of changes to the acromion.

The body attempts to heal these damaged fibres (see also healing phases), which is typically accompanied in the initial stage, the inflammation phase, by swelling and pain. Due to the swelling however, the already narrow osseous channel becomes even narrower for the musculature. The result of this is a type of clamping of the musculature (= impingement) with pain when turning the arm inwards and outwards, when lifting the arm and primarily when lying on the affected shoulder at night. See also PDF download

This is often known as impingement syndrome. In the context of these symptoms, painful inflammation of the bursa in the shoulder often occurs. In chronic cases, this bursa calcifies (bursitis calcarea). This can lead to persistent pain and often results in the need for an operation (arthroscopy and evacuation of the calcium deposit).

 

Please note that medical indications and treatments change constantly. Sometimes these changes occur more rapidly than I am able to update on my homepage. Some information regarding dosage, prescription and compositions of medications may have changed in the meantime. Reading an internet page cannot replace visiting a doctor - it may be that during an examination and subsequent discussion with your doctor, other information is also communicated as a result of new scientific knowledge.