• www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at
  • www.sportordination.at

Stress fractures

The stress fracture is also called a fatigue fracture. It relates to relatively common overexertion damage to the locomotor system that is often detected late. Stress fractures mainly occur in the region of the lower extremities and require frequent, often cyclical, exertion. Stress fractures often occur in competitive athletes, but also soldiers after particularly long foot marches and are therefore also called "march fractures".

Stress fractures are often not visible on normal X-ray images for a long time.

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is required to make the quick and correct diagnosis of a stress fracture.

X-ray images must be taken for investigation. A confirmed diagnosis, however, is made using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Treatment consists of consistent investigation of possible malpositions of the locomotor system, which could lead to excessive exertion, and the treatment thereof. Once malpositions have been ruled out, intensive physical therapy is commenced, as well as a pause in training, which can last up to eight weeks depending on the symptoms and the severity of the stress fracture. During the pause in training, other sport and build-up options can be followed.

For further information please also see:

Medicine Worldwide: Sports injuries

Please note that medical indications and treatments change constantly. Sometimes these changes occur more rapidly than I am able to update on my homepage. Some information regarding dosage, prescription and compositions of medications may have changed in the meantime. Reading an internet page cannot replace visiting a doctor - it may be that during an examination and subsequent discussion with your doctor, other information is also communicated as a result of new scientific knowledge.